Rob Robinson | The ComplexDiscovery Blog

A technology blog highlighting data and legal discovery insight and intelligence.

    Activity Patterns for eDiscovery Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments (2001-2017)

    Activity Patterns for eDiscovery Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments (2001-2017)

    Since beginning to track the number of publicly highlighted merger, acquisition, and investment (M&A+I) events in the eDiscovery ecosystem, ComplexDiscovery has noted more than 300 M&A+I events between November 2001 and today. The following article highlights the pattern of these activities on an annual and monthly basis.

    Continue Reading

    An Abridged Look at the Business of eDiscovery: Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments

    An Abridged Look at the Business of eDiscovery: Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments

    The presented listing highlights key industry business moves by sharing the announcement date, acquired company, acquiring or investing company, and acquisition amount (if known) of significant eDiscovery-related mergers, acquisitions, and investments.

    Continue Reading

    A Running List: Top 100+ eDiscovery Providers

    A Running List: Top 100+ eDiscovery Providers

    Based on a compilation of research from analyst firms and industry expert reports in the electronic discovery arena, the following “Top 100+Provider” list provides a short listing that may be useful in the consideration of eDiscovery providers. This listing is taken primarily from eDiscovery provider mentions in selected key formal industry reports and surveys published between August 2011 and today.

    Continue Reading

    Validated Market Opportunities for 2017: SaaS-based Legal and Data Discovery Automation

    Validated Market Opportunities for 2017: SaaS-based Legal and Data Discovery Automation

    In 2017, the challenge for technology providers in the legal and data discovery spaces appears to be less about defining offering requirements and validating market needs and more about developing and delivering solutions that focus on specific tasks and processes that streamline the discovery of data and the conduct of eDiscovery.

    Continue Reading

    A Concise Framework for Discovery Automation

    A Concise Framework for Discovery Automation

    One of the biggest challenges facing information, business, and legal professionals is the ability to cohesively consider the elements of data discovery and legal discovery within a technology framework that is comprehensive enough to address critical discovery tasks throughout information and legal lifecycles yet concise enough to be realistically approached from an automation perspective.

    Continue Reading

    industry

    Did Data Scraping Just Get A Tiny Bit Safer?

    Extract from article from Dickson Wright

    Is it okay to scrape data from another website? This is a frequently asked question that almost always leads to an ambiguous and equivocal answer. Legal practitioners are quick to point out the risks of civil and criminal liability that could be incurred by scraping data from someone else’s website, and several lawsuits have been spurred by the practice. This week, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California (the “Court”) issued an order in hiQ Labs, Inc. v. LinkedIn Corporation that may foretell of a somewhat safer landscape for some data scrapers.

    What is data “scraping”? Basically, it is the process by which a company uses a software algorithm to automatically collect or harvest data.

    Additional Reading:

     

     

    LinkedOut: Court finds Ex-Employee Likely Violated Non-Solicitation Provision with LinkedIn Post


    Extract from article by Russell Kostelak

    The use of social media sites, like LinkedIn, can be a helpful tool to reach a customer base. But a recent district court case out of Minnesota exemplifies the need to ensure that LinkedIn usage complies with the user’s employment agreement. Specifically, in late July 2017, a Minnesota court in Mobile Mini, Inc. v. Vevea granted a preliminary injunction preventing a LinkedIn user from soliciting customers through the website in violation of non-solicitation clause in the employment agreement of her prior employer. The opinion differentiates between posting mere status updates and posting solicitations, the latter of which can trigger violations of non-solicitation clauses.

    Additional Reading:

    Legal Tech + AI in Germany: Things Are Evolving

    Extract from Artificial Lawyer interview with Dr. Jochen Brandhoff

    If there are barriers to adopting more advanced legal tech in Germany, e.g. AI systems, why is this? Are there any structural or market reasons that are preventing this?

    Yes, there are a few barriers. One of the largest is a lack of capital. The legal market is still new to financial investors. Venture capital and private equity companies as well as many ‘business angels’ often do not understand the digital business models in the legal market.

    There are many reasons for this. One reason is that the legal market is somewhat different from the ones they are familiar with. It is highly regulated, which investors often dislike. Another reason is that they have difficulties in judging the size of the market and the scalability of a business model. With so little capital, it is difficult to have truly great innovations. But you can still fill important niches.

    Why is the legal market so new to investors? Here we come to the second barrier. Investors are not allowed to invest in law firms. Law firms in Germany are subject to prohibitions on ‘third party’ ownership or capital participation, unlike law firms in the UK after the passage of Legal Services Act of 2007.

    This means, simply put, that law firms can only be owned by lawyers (and, to some extent, by tax advisors and accountants) – but under no circumstances can a purely financial investor take part in the law firm. Law firms thus invest only a (tiny) portion of their profits into technology development. I don’t want to make a value-judgment on whether these two prohibitions produce more advantages or disadvantages for the legal market. I will simply say that they are too poorly funded to be able to produce a great leap in technology.

    Additional Reading:


    industry

    Did Data Scraping Just Get A Tiny Bit Safer?
    Did Data Scraping Just Get A Tiny Bit Safer?

    Is it okay to scrape data from another website? This is a frequently asked question that almost alwa…

    More in industry

    Insight

    Summer Doldrums? 18 Observations on Summer 2017 eDiscovery Business Confidence
    Summer Doldrums? 18 Observations on Summer 2017 eDiscovery Business Confidence

    Summer 2017 eDiscovery Confidence: Survey respondents appear to have a slightly less optimistic view…

    More in Insight

    Newsletters

    Five Great Reads on Information Governance and eDiscovery: ILTA Edition
    Five Great Reads on Information Governance and eDiscovery: ILTA Edition

    This edition of the newsletter highlights five key posts on information governance and electronic di…

    More in Newsletters