Rob Robinson | The ComplexDiscovery Blog

A technology blog highlighting data and legal discovery insight and intelligence.

    An eDiscovery Market Size Mashup: 2017-2022 Worldwide Software and Services Overview

    An eDiscovery Market Size Mashup: 2017-2022 Worldwide Software and Services Overview

    Taken from a combination of public market sizing estimations as shared in leading electronic discovery reports, publications and posts over time, the following eDiscovery Market Size Mashup shares general worldwide market sizing considerations for software and services in the electronic discovery market for the years between 2017 and 2022.

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    Avoiding Glittering Generalities in Selecting eDiscovery Software

    Avoiding Glittering Generalities in Selecting eDiscovery Software

    In navigating the glittering generalities presented by individuals and organizations seeking to influence eDiscovery software selection decisions, remember that there may be many right choices for your specific needs. Considering those choices through the lens of security, capability, complexity, and cost may help ensure that you not only make the right choice but make the best choice for your needs.

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    Activity Patterns for eDiscovery Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments (2001-2017)

    Activity Patterns for eDiscovery Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments (2001-2017)

    Since beginning to track the number of publicly highlighted merger, acquisition, and investment (M&A+I) events in the eDiscovery ecosystem, ComplexDiscovery has noted more than 300 M&A+I events between November 2001 and today. The following article highlights the pattern of these activities on an annual and monthly basis.

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    An Abridged Look at the Business of eDiscovery: Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments

    An Abridged Look at the Business of eDiscovery: Mergers, Acquisitions, and Investments

    The presented listing highlights key industry business moves by sharing the announcement date, acquired company, acquiring or investing company, and acquisition amount (if known) of significant eDiscovery-related mergers, acquisitions, and investments.

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    A Running List: Top 100+ eDiscovery Providers

    A Running List: Top 100+ eDiscovery Providers

    Based on a compilation of research from analyst firms and industry expert reports in the electronic discovery arena, the following “Top 100+Provider” list provides a short listing that may be useful in the consideration of eDiscovery providers. This listing is taken primarily from eDiscovery provider mentions in selected key formal industry reports and surveys published between August 2011 and today.

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    Relativity: Chicago’s own Salesforce?


    Extract from article by John Pletz

    When it comes to software companies, talk of platforms—products that are so widely used that other companies build ancillary software on top of them—is almost always more aspirational than actual. Except maybe in the case of Chicago’s Relativity.

    All but one of the country’s 200 largest law firms employ Relativity’s software to sift through mountains of emails and other documents turned over during the discovery phase of litigation. It’s also used by legal departments of 73 of the Fortune 100. Companies from startups, such as Chicago’s Milyli and NexLP, to large legal services and consulting firms have built over 75 apps for Relativity. Formerly called kCura, Relativity has invested in two other Chicago startups, Esquify and Heretik, and just launched a formal venture-capital program.

    The company’s annual Relativity Fest, which drew nearly 2,000 of its 150,000 users to the Palmer House in October, “has been the e-discovery conference to go to the past couple of years,” says Chris Bojar, litigation-support manager at Chicago law firm Barack Ferrazzano Kirschbaum & Nagelberg.

    What CEO Andrew Sieja has done “is straight out of the Marc Benioff playbook,” says Mark Tebbe, referring to the founder of San Francisco-based Salesforce.com, which dominates sales software. Tebbe, who leads ChicagoNext, the tech arm of economic development agency World Business Chicago, has known Sieja since hiring him as a coder at tech consulting firm Lante during the dot-com boom almost two decades ago.

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    2017 Year-End E-Discovery Update (Gibson Dunn)

    Extract from article from Gibson Dunn (Gareth Evans, Jennifer Rearden, Heather Richardson, Chelsea Mae Thomas, and Natalie Dygert

    The consolidation among medium-sized and large e-discovery service providers, usually financed by private equity funding, that has been going on for several years now only seemed to accelerate more in 2017. It is not apparent whether this consolidation is fundamentally altering the market for e-discovery services, other than to possibly result in greater stability in the space once all of the M&A dust settles.

    Generally, the market appears to be settling into several different segments: (1) large vendors with a national and often international footprint providing basic, commodity services using mostly standard technologies; (2) medium-sized vendors—also with a national and global footprint—focused on providing both expert e-discovery consulting and professional services as well as standard and more advanced technologies; (3) vendors of “do it yourself” online e-discovery software services (i.e., “SAAS,” aka software as a service), usually targeted at small and medium-sized law firms that now, increasingly, must deal with e-discovery; and (4) traditional local and regional vendors providing basic services, much as they have in the past.

    The local and regional vendors seem to be increasingly squeezed in this market, either being acquired by or not able to compete with the large vendors providing commodity services. Notably, it appears that there are far fewer new entrants in e-discovery services market—which used to have relatively low barriers to entry—than in the past. Also, there appears to have been significant maturation of some of the SAAS providers, which appear to be finding a solid niche in a potentially large market segment—small and medium-sized law practices—often not previously serviced by e-discovery providers.

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    Nearly Everyone Backs Microsoft in Landmark Email Privacy Case—Except the DOJ

    Extract from article by Kate Conger

    Microsoft’s landmark email privacy case is set to go before the Supreme Court next month, and the company has received widespread support from other tech giants, members of Congress, and foreign governments. One party that opposes Microsoft’s move? The Department of Justice.

    The case began in 2013, when Microsoft challenged a warrant for emails stored in a data center in Ireland. The company argued that a warrant was not sufficient to demand emails stored outside the United States, an argument that the Justice Department has fought against all the way to the Supreme Court.

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    industry

    Relativity: Chicago's own Salesforce?
    Relativity: Chicago’s own Salesforce?

    When it comes to software companies, talk of platforms—products that are so widely used that other…

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    Insight

    Apparently Size Does Matter: eDiscovery Business Confidence Survey Results - Winter 2018
    Apparently Size Does Matter: eDiscovery Business Confidence Survey Results – Winter 2018

    The Winter 2018 eDiscovery Business Confidence Survey is a non-scientific survey designed to provide…

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    Newsletters

    Five Great Reads on Data Discovery and Legal Discovery for January 2018
    Five Great Reads on Data Discovery and Legal Discovery for January 2018

    A selection of five articles shared regularly to inform and update legal and information technology …

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