Seventh Circuit Rejects And Lambasts “Worthless” Settlement For Class Of Subway Sandwich Purchasers

Extract from article by Gerald Maatman and John Marrese

In 2013, after an online photo went viral showing one customer’s Footlong Subway sandwich was in fact only 11 inches, a slew of plaintiffs’ attorneys filed putative class actions against Subway for damages and injunctive relief.  Id. at *3-4.   The class actions were consolidated in a multidistrict litigation in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin.  Id. at *4-5.

Limited discovery revealed that the claims had little merit as: (i) Subway had taken steps to ensure that its Footlongs were in fact 12 inches long; (ii) the minor variability in bread length revealed was due to natural and unpreventable variability in the baking process; and (iii) irrespective of bread length, customers received the same amount of meat, cheese, and other toppings on a sandwich.  Id. Such facts eliminated any hope of certification of a damages class under Rule 23(b)(3), so class counsel focused on certification of a Rule 23(b)(2) injunctive relief class instead.  Id. at *5-6.

The parties subsequently reached a settlement for injunctive relief whereby Subway agreed to implement measures aimed at ensuring Subway Footlongs were in fact 12 inches long, including: (i) requiring franchisees to use a measuring tool for sandwiches; (ii) requiring corporate quality-control inspectors to measure baked bread and check oven operation during regularly scheduled visits; and (iii) posting a notice on its website and in restaurants notifying customers of the variability in baked bread.  Id. at *7.

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